You may be reluctant to be dragged back into thinking about Sept. 11, now that we’ve just completed a weekend of wallowing in remembrance of the tragedy that killed nearly 3,000 people.

No, nobody breathed a word, so far as I can tell, about the more than 100,000 Iraqi civilians who died as a consequence of our actions following the terrorist attacks.

Nor did anyone say much about the nearly 7,000 U.S. soldiers and “contractors” who have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan since, in wars still going on for no apparent rational reason.

That doesn’t mean Sept. 11’s victims of irrational Islamic terror shouldn’t be remembered. Just that we should not forget that their families aren’t alone in suffering, or that countless other nameless families weep in nameless villages as a result.

And we should remember too, that it could have been very different. What follows is what I wish I could have written this week:

(see above link)

It is positive development that in addition to ongoing probes in the UK, the FBI has launched an investigation into the conduct of News Corp. employees. These inquiries must allow for a full public airing of the behavior of these irresponsible news outlets. If criminal behavior is found to have occurred, I hope those liable are prosecuted.

However there is also a need for a broader conversation about how the media has fallen down on its responsibilities — not by tapping the phones of celebrities, politicians and victims of crimes and terrorist attacks – but by failing to insure the public is truly informed about the most pressing issues of the day.

Al Gore weighs in on hacking scandal

Gore, of course, has been locked in battle with News Corp. lately over its subsidiary Sky Italia’s decision to drop Current TV. Gore claimed that the channel was dropped because it hired Keith Olbermann, a frequent News Corp critic, but News Corp insiders told The Guardian it was because the two sides couldn’t reach a commercial agreement. - POLITICO

 
Vice President Al Gore in The New Republic on the Gulf Oil spill:

…the illusion that we can meaningfully reduce our dependence on foreign oil by taking extraordinary risks to develop deep reserves in the Outer Continental Shelf is illuminated by the illustration above. The addition to oil company profits may be significant, but the benefits to our national security are trivial.

     Gore posts this chart showing U.S. oil consumption. That itsy-bitsy gold sliver at the top of the chart represents how much of oil we use that could be obtained from new drilling off our own shores.
via realitychex via thenewrepublic 

Vice President Al Gore in The New Republic on the Gulf Oil spill:

…the illusion that we can meaningfully reduce our dependence on foreign oil by taking extraordinary risks to develop deep reserves in the Outer Continental Shelf is illuminated by the illustration above. The addition to oil company profits may be significant, but the benefits to our national security are trivial.

     Gore posts this chart showing U.S. oil consumption. That itsy-bitsy gold sliver at the top of the chart represents how much of oil we use that could be obtained from new drilling off our own shores.

via realitychex via thenewrepublic