parislemon

parislemon:

Fascinating interactive map by The New York Times new site, TheUpshot, showcasing baseball fandom around the country (from Facebook data).

Note that neither the Mets nor the A’s show up at all. And, perhaps unsurprisingly, the Yankees control most of the areas without any true geographical connections to teams.

I think most would be surprised that it was the Mets, not the Yankees, who first drew 3 million fans to their ballpark in N.Y. There are many variables as to why, but I don’t think people realize how much those 80s Mets owned N.Y. 

parislemon

parislemon:

Ellis Hamburger:

But after just a few years, sharing on Facebook feels like walking up to a group of parents, teachers, friends, cousins, camp counselors, classmates, and colleagues, and boasting about my latest accomplishment, or about the merits of the brunch I just ate. “People treat posting on Facebook like it’s public,” says danah boyd, a sociology researcher who interviewed over 150 teens for her recent book on social media. If Facebook wants its News Feed to remain the source of news about friends, family, and other people we care about it, it needs to change its definition of friendship.

Lots of good points. While Facebook is doing a lot to ensure the company doesn’t get disrupted from the outside (read: Instagram, WhatsApp, and to some extent, even Oculus), inside, the network is definitely starting to have the feel of social rot.

Relationships change over time. And Facebook has now been around long enough to be exposed to this. This is problematic if they do want to maintain the lead as the “social network”. But maybe they don’t. Maybe that network was just the start.

parislemon

parislemon:

Om Malik on the recent movement away from Facebook’s centralized way of doing things:

You can see this cycle through the entire history of the commercial Internet. The original web was so sparse (but also so slow to navigate) that Yahoo was started as a guide of worthwhile sites because it wasn’t easy to flit among web pages. Yahoo’s directory proved popular, and sensing opportunity, the company added all sorts of new features: search, chat, email, stock tickers, sports, news, personals, e-commerce, and photos. By the late 1990s, Yahoo had become the grand aggregator, its pages as cluttered as a Canal Street stall. This created an opening for Google, with its bare-bones home page that held only a search box and company logo. With the rise of broadband, which made it easy to jump around, the web became disaggregated and brought with it focused, functional tools such as Skype and YouTube.

Fast-forward to today and replace ­Yahoo with Facebook. Facebook showed us the value of aggregating all of those small chunks of information, including photos and status updates, that we wanted to consume on the now dynamic and interactive web. That single string of updates, known as News Feed, was a brilliant product that powered the company’s rise from 2006 to 2011. Then along came Instagram and its peers, born for a generation that doesn’t know how to live without an always-on connection. They facilitate new online behaviors that have been invented for a world of touch and mobile. These apps were designed to be great at just one or two things. The tech world had swung back to being simple, lightweight, and fast—at precisely the same time that Facebook feeds were becoming so bloated and complicated.

Yep, it’s cyclical. And this is also why Facebook is now working to unbundle its own services, to distance itself from the cluttered mess it has become — before it’s too late.

giphy
giphy:

GIFs on Facebook.
Wait. GIFs on Facebook?!
We did it. GIFs on Facebook! Giphy’s got all the GIFs and now you can share them with your friends on Facebook. You can embed them right onto your timeline from our site.
Not sure how to feel? That’s why we created the GIF Reaction Page. So go ahead and try it out!
Man, remember yesterday, when you couldn’t post GIFs on Facebook? Nope, we can’t either. 

giphy:

GIFs on Facebook.

Wait. GIFs on Facebook?!

We did it. GIFs on Facebook! Giphy’s got all the GIFs and now you can share them with your friends on Facebook. You can embed them right onto your timeline from our site.

Not sure how to feel? That’s why we created the GIF Reaction Page. So go ahead and try it out!

Man, remember yesterday, when you couldn’t post GIFs on Facebook? Nope, we can’t either. 

“If this is your husband,” wrote a Facebook user on Wednesday, “I have endured a 2 hour train ride from Philadelphia listening to this loser and his friends brag about their multiple affairs and how their wives are too stupid to catch on. Oh please repost …” And people did — the post currently has over 27,000 shares.

Alleged cheating husband gets shamed on Facebook - Salon

More: Woman who photographed alleged cheater: “I just thought he was such a pig”