Posts Tagged "Internet"

fastcompany:

Happy 25th Birthday, World Wide Web! Our Gift: An Intentionally Brief History Of You

On March 12, 1989, the visual layer of the Internet was quietly revealed, fundamentally changing the way we communicate, research, consume and share media, waste time at work, and, well, do everything else really. It was called the World Wide Web. To celebrate, we’ve put together a purposefully brisk and oversimplified history (trust us, you don’t want to see the unabridged version) leading up to its now 25 years of existence.

Read> Fast Company

giphy:

GIFs on Facebook.
Wait. GIFs on Facebook?!
We did it. GIFs on Facebook! Giphy’s got all the GIFs and now you can share them with your friends on Facebook. You can embed them right onto your timeline from our site.
Not sure how to feel? That’s why we created the GIF Reaction Page. So go ahead and try it out!
Man, remember yesterday, when you couldn’t post GIFs on Facebook? Nope, we can’t either. 

giphy:

GIFs on Facebook.

Wait. GIFs on Facebook?!

We did it. GIFs on Facebook! Giphy’s got all the GIFs and now you can share them with your friends on Facebook. You can embed them right onto your timeline from our site.

Not sure how to feel? That’s why we created the GIF Reaction Page. So go ahead and try it out!

Man, remember yesterday, when you couldn’t post GIFs on Facebook? Nope, we can’t either. 

kohenari:

When Marc Anthony sang “God Bless America” at last night’s MLB All-Star Game, racists were understandably outraged since baseball is America’s national pastime and Anthony is clearly not American.

I mean, just look at the guy!

Anyhow, these two guys win the award for Most Idiotic Tweets I’ve Seen Today. When presented with the fact that Anthony is, in fact, American, they continue to insist that there’s some sort of problem, honestly convinced that it’s impossible for someone to be Latino and American at the same time. After all, he’s clearly not white and doesn’t look like he could possibly be from New York.

Stupid facts. Always trying to get in the way of people’s racism.

kohenari:

I don’t think the dictionary really matters that much to CBS Sports commentator Tim Brando. At least not based on anything he wrote during a Twitter tirade today that lasted a few hours and, as I type this, is still going on.

Now, when I think about heroism, as I happen to do as the author of a book and co-host of a podcast on the topic, here’s the sort of thing I have in mind:

People act heroically when they make a potentially life-altering sacrifice or put themselves at some serious risk and they need not have done so. Most often, today, heroes are those whose actions are seen to benefit others; in the classical sense, however, heroism included a broader range of martial actions or feats of endurance that were not necessarily other-regarding.

There’s more to say, obviously, but that’s a quick first pass at a definition. It’s interesting and potentially very fruitful to debate particular heroes and definitions of heroic actions — and, obviously, I’m counting on it for the success of my book — but it’s noteworthy that Brando seems not to have offered a definition at all, despite claiming that his Twitter tirade was all due to his deep care for definitions.

"his deep care for definitions." LOL!

kohenari:

Look out, fellow Jews; Donald Trump is on to us! We used to be able to just change our names and blend right in.

I wonder what Trump’s daughter thinks about her dad tweeting a little anti-Semitic chin music at Jon Stewart.

The inspiring heroism of Aaron Swartz →

kohenari:

Glenn Greenwald has a powerful piece on Aaron Swartz, internet freedom, and aggressive prosecution … but what really stands out is his concise and thoughtful definition of Swartz’s heroism:

Specifically, he committed himself to the causes in which he so passionately believed: internet freedom, civil liberties, making information and knowledge as available as possible. Here he is in his May, 2012 keynote address at the Freedom To Connect conference discussing the role he played in stopping SOPA, the movie-industry-demanded legislation that would have vested the government with dangerous censorship powers over the internet.

Critically, Swartz didn’t commit himself to these causes merely by talking about them or advocating for them. He repeatedly sacrificed his own interests, even his liberty, in order to defend these values and challenge and subvert the most powerful factions that were their enemies. That’s what makes him, in my view, so consummately heroic.

inothernews:

Sigh.

This photo — of the fine folks at Mashable HQ — popped up on my Facebook feed yesterday.  And it was jarring, because… well, it made me wonder just how diverse the worlds of social media and tech are.

And how much more it needs to be.

I’m not holding anything against Mashable, because that might be a little unfair.  But seeing a picture like should make you think about the lack of diversity in these Interwebz that we all inhabit.

Just ask Mashable.

shortformblog:

imwithkanye:

That’s right, Stacy just got Buzzed as in Feed! Starting in May, I’ll return to the Big Apple to blog about everything that is buzzworthy on the Internet. :)

Whoa. In which our favorite pop-culture Tumblr gets a job with one of our favorite sites. Dude. DUDE. Us DC folks will have to send one of our own off! Major props to Stacy!

1 in 5 Americans Are "Internet Innocents" - CIO →

Who are these Internet holdouts? According to Pew, they’re senior citizens, Spanish speakers, adults with less than a high school education, and folks in households with annual incomes of less than $30,000.

Of the adults who don’t use the Internet, almost half of them said the Net is irrelevant to them, finds the survey, which is based on interviews with more than 2200 adults 18 years old and older.

Most non-users have never used the Net before and don’t have anybody in their household who uses it either, Pew’s researchers discovered.

About 20 percent of Internet innocents say they don’t know enough about technology to use the Net, surveyors find; and about one in ten non-users say they won’t be interested in using the Internet or e-mail in the future.