A concerted effort to unseat Speaker John A. Boehner was under way the day of his re-election to the position, but participants called it off 30 minutes before the House floor vote, CQ Roll Call has learned.

A group of disaffected conservatives had agreed to vote against the Ohio lawmaker if they could get at least 25 members to join the effort. But one member, whose identity could not be verified, rescinded his or her participation the morning of the vote, leaving the group one person short of its self-imposed 25-member threshold.
"Jim Jordan’s boneheadedness has kind of informed everybody’s thinking," said one of the sources, both of whom spoke only on condition of anonymity. "The easiest option for everybody has presented itself."

(…)

"He doesn’t know it, but he solved a problem for Republican line-drawers by (figuratively) standing up and saying, ‘I’m a jerk and I deserved to be punished,’ " said one of the sources.

Jordan’s rural 11-county district, which has a 60 percent Republican voter index, “is easy to cannibalize because it stretches so far,” said the other source.

Payback may be coming for congressman’s ‘disloyalty’ - The Columbus Dispatch

U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan’s open defiance of Speaker John Boehner’s efforts to solve the debt-ceiling crisis could cost the Urbana Republican his safe seat in next year’s election.

Two Republican sources deeply involved in configuring new Ohio congressional districts confirmed to The Dispatch today that Jordan’s disloyalty to Boehner has put him in jeopardy of being zeroed out of a district.

Jordan, a tea party favorite who chairs the 170-plus member Republican Study Committee, has stymied Boehner’s efforts to raise the debt ceiling.

Obama Will Have Last Laugh
Before the midterm elections, early fall 2010, President Obama sent clear signals that he would concede his campaign promise and go ahead and extend the Bush tax cuts for those making over $250,000 a year. A broken promise that, at the time, some thought unforgivable.
The consensus opinion from Democratic politicians and pundits alike was that Obama had shown his cards too early, left himself with no leverage. Obama stated back in 2009, "You don’t raise taxes in a recession. We haven’t raised taxes in a recession.” And now he was throwing the left, his own, under the bus. And for what? Few gave him the benefit of the doubt even though he passed, with the 2009 Stimulus, a package that included tax-cuts for 95% of working families.
Part of the frustration with the President was that this was taking place during a lame duck session, a time most observers freely admit is tough to pass any sort of meaningful legislation. Some felt that since the Democrats controlled the House, Senate and the Oval office, a stronger, more aggressive president would have been able to push through a progressive agenda. 
So, the knives were out. Like now, the president was taking criticism from both sides. The GOP, although it was well known that they’d get the Bush tax-cuts extension, still seemed heartless to some. On Nov 18, 2010, House Republicans blocked a bill that would have extended long-term unemployment benefits.
Despite the criticism, the President extended the Bush tax cuts. Some, certainly not many, gave him a pass, asserting that this is what we should expect from him. As Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO) explained to Politico:
“What you are seeing now is what he always wanted to be. In his heart, he’s a pragmatist, not an ideologue, and he’s a lot more personally comfortable with being able to engage Republicans and not be as divisive.”
But after months of being told how Obama was getting his clocked cleaned, what other legislation did Obama pass during the 2010 lame duck session? 
Don’t Ask Don’t Tell: The repeal of the ban on gays serving openly in the military. 
START: Nuclear-arms reduction agreement with Russia. 
Health bill for 9/11 first responders. 
A food safety bill. 
Middle-class tax cuts. 
Extension of jobless benefits
Child nutrition bill.
“Nobody expected it to be this productive,” said NPR White House correspondent Ari Shapiro.
Fast forward to today. Both sides are unhappy, angry, up in arms with what the President is supposedly proposing. Sound familiar? I can’t help harkening back to late fall, early winter 2010 while I watch this debt ceiling debacle drone on and on. But, when it was reported that the individual mandate was being discussed, that the individual mandate from the Affordable Care Act had crept into these negotiations? This was my moment of clarity.
It’s Speaker of the House John Boehner who appears to be getting his clock cleaned this time. And unlike Obama during the 2010 lame duck session, I don’t think there’s a way out for him. I’m more certain now that President Obama will be laughing last when this debt ceiling ordeal is finally over. Boehner is in salvage mode. He wants something, anything that will placate the Tea Party folks. No matter if it’s hollow and meaningless. It has been widely reported that the individual mandate will be close to impossible to enforce, nor does the Obama Administration wish to enforce it. It’s equivalent to jaywalking — everyone gets away with it. This seems like a pure fluff, no substance ploy. Boehner is trying to come away with a bone to toss to Rep. Cantor, who can then run back to his Tea Party constituents and say, “Lookie here. Lookie what I got!!”
Bottom line: it may be unwise to underestimate this president. Don’t be surprised if we see him play this game – strike some kind of deal that looks, on the face of it, like a huge Republican victory. For example: give up the individual mandate. But then we come to find out, in the fine print, was it huge after all?… Umm, not so much.

Obama Will Have Last Laugh

Before the midterm elections, early fall 2010, President Obama sent clear signals that he would concede his campaign promise and go ahead and extend the Bush tax cuts for those making over $250,000 a year. A broken promise that, at the time, some thought unforgivable.

The consensus opinion from Democratic politicians and pundits alike was that Obama had shown his cards too early, left himself with no leverage. Obama stated back in 2009, "You don’t raise taxes in a recession. We haven’t raised taxes in a recession.” And now he was throwing the left, his own, under the bus. And for what? Few gave him the benefit of the doubt even though he passed, with the 2009 Stimulus, a package that included tax-cuts for 95% of working families.

Part of the frustration with the President was that this was taking place during a lame duck session, a time most observers freely admit is tough to pass any sort of meaningful legislation. Some felt that since the Democrats controlled the House, Senate and the Oval office, a stronger, more aggressive president would have been able to push through a progressive agenda. 

So, the knives were out. Like now, the president was taking criticism from both sides. The GOP, although it was well known that they’d get the Bush tax-cuts extension, still seemed heartless to some. On Nov 18, 2010, House Republicans blocked a bill that would have extended long-term unemployment benefits.

Despite the criticism, the President extended the Bush tax cuts. Some, certainly not many, gave him a pass, asserting that this is what we should expect from him. As Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO) explained to Politico:

“What you are seeing now is what he always wanted to be. In his heart, he’s a pragmatist, not an ideologue, and he’s a lot more personally comfortable with being able to engage Republicans and not be as divisive.”

But after months of being told how Obama was getting his clocked cleaned, what other legislation did Obama pass during the 2010 lame duck session? 

  • Don’t Ask Don’t Tell: The repeal of the ban on gays serving openly in the military. 
  • START: Nuclear-arms reduction agreement with Russia. 
  • Health bill for 9/11 first responders. 
  • A food safety bill. 
  • Middle-class tax cuts. 
  • Extension of jobless benefits
  • Child nutrition bill.

“Nobody expected it to be this productive,” said NPR White House correspondent Ari Shapiro.

Fast forward to today. Both sides are unhappy, angry, up in arms with what the President is supposedly proposing. Sound familiar? I can’t help harkening back to late fall, early winter 2010 while I watch this debt ceiling debacle drone on and on. But, when it was reported that the individual mandate was being discussed, that the individual mandate from the Affordable Care Act had crept into these negotiations? This was my moment of clarity.

It’s Speaker of the House John Boehner who appears to be getting his clock cleaned this time. And unlike Obama during the 2010 lame duck session, I don’t think there’s a way out for him. I’m more certain now that President Obama will be laughing last when this debt ceiling ordeal is finally over. Boehner is in salvage mode. He wants something, anything that will placate the Tea Party folks. No matter if it’s hollow and meaningless. It has been widely reported that the individual mandate will be close to impossible to enforce, nor does the Obama Administration wish to enforce it. It’s equivalent to jaywalking — everyone gets away with it. This seems like a pure fluff, no substance ploy. Boehner is trying to come away with a bone to toss to Rep. Cantor, who can then run back to his Tea Party constituents and say, “Lookie here. Lookie what I got!!”

Bottom line: it may be unwise to underestimate this president. Don’t be surprised if we see him play this game – strike some kind of deal that looks, on the face of it, like a huge Republican victory. For example: give up the individual mandate. But then we come to find out, in the fine print, was it huge after all?… Umm, not so much.

After a tense 50-minute meeting with congressional leaders at the White House on Saturday, President Obama blasted lawmakers for “reckless political games” and reasserted his refusal to sign a temporary measure to raise the debt ceiling.

In a statement from White House press secretary Jay Carney, the White House said that Obama refused again to sign a shot-term deal, saying it “would be irresponsible to put our country at risk again in just a few short months with another battle over raising the debt ceiling.”

"Congress should refrain from playing reckless political games with our economy," Carney said. "Instead, it should be responsible and do its job, avoiding default and cutting the deficit."

According to the statement, the lawmakers agreed to “return to Capitol Hill to talk to their members and discuss a way forward, and conversations will continue throughout the day.”

(…)

"The President wanted to know that there was a plan for preventing national default," McConnell said in a statement released after the meeting. "The bipartisan leadership in Congress is committed to working on new legislation that will prevent default while substantially reducing Washington spending."

Boehner, who announced Friday evening that he was breaking off talks with the White House, issued a statement that didn’t even mention the president or the administration.

“As I said last night, over this weekend Congress will forge a responsible path forward,” the Speaker said in a statement. “House and Senate leaders will be working to find a bipartisan solution to significantly reduce Washington spending and preserve the full faith and credit of the United States.”

Emphasis mine. It’s looking more and more like Boehner knows the eventual deal, if one is struck, will not be something that he can brag about to his constituents. Boehner is obviously going out of his way not to mention the President, attempting to marginalize Obama’s role so the “reasonable,” “rational” tag that some have placed on the President won’t stick in some quarters. 

This is something I must have picked up from Lawrence O’Donnell, whose analysis on the debt ceiling crisis and the President’s strategy has been eyeopening and seemingly spot on.