McCain said he didn’t agree with fellow Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, who argued Friday the Obama administration is calling for a review of “stand your ground” laws as a way to further its agenda against Second Amendment rights.

“Isn’t it time for America to come together?” McCain asked. “I’d rather have a message of coming together and discussing these issues rather than condemning.

“I respect (Cruz’s) view, but I don’t frankly see the connection,” he added.
shortformblog

First reactions to President Obama’s nomination of Chuck Hagel for Secretary of Defense…

shortformblog:

  • Sen. Inhofe (R-OK): “In the months and years ahead, the Defense Department will be confronted with significant challenges from budget issues to Afghanistan policy. … I am aware of the serious concerns about some of [Hagel’s] policy positions, his record, and some of his comments that have been publicly reported. I will be seeking clarification from him about these concerns as his nomination proceeds.” source
  • Sen. McCain (R-AZ): ”I have serious concerns about positions Senator Hagel has taken on a range of critical national security issues in recent years, which we will fully consider in the course of his confirmation process before the Senate Armed Services Committee.” source
  • Rep. Cantor (R-VA): “Recent reporting has made clear that Senator Hagel’s views and inflammatory statements about Israel are well outside the mainstream and raise well-founded doubts that he can be trusted to manage the special relationship the United States shares with our greatest Middle East all.” source
  • Barney Frank:With the attack coming out of the right, I hope he gets confirmed.” source

mediamattersforamerica
They had an election and they elected moderates. They rejected Islamists. And yes, there are al-Qaeda factors and there are extremists in Libya today, but the Libyan people are friends of ours, and they support us, and they support democracy. So you were wrong about — so you were wrong about Libya.
“Down in Arizona today, Maricopa County has the highest number of homes underwater of any place in this country,” he told reporters Wednesday. “And it’s disgraceful that we took care of the financial institutions, and we did nothing about the housing crisis. So I understand their frustration.”

He later quipped that he may be the “only” Republican who does.

"I introduced a bill to lower the debt ceiling not raise it. And, I just think, raising the debt ceiling is not the way to go." - Rep. Paul Broun (R-Ga.)

"I just heard the greatest thing. You have just entered into the record, Andrea, the single stupidest thing said or proposed by anyone in the debt ceiling debate. Rep. Paul Broun, has a bill, to lower the debt ceiling, and he now achieves the prize for stupidest idea of the year. Just breathtaking.” - Lawrence O’Donnell via MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports

"It’s bizarro"

"That is not fair to the American people, to hold out and say we won’t agree to raising the debt limit until we pass a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution. It’s unfair, it’s bizarro. And maybe some people who have only been in this body for six or seven months or so really believe that. Others know better. Others know better." - Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) Watch via ThinkProgress

McCain Questions Pentagon on Repealing ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’
At one point, Mr. McCain sharply asked Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, whose testimony led off the Pentagon’s position, if he was not concerned that so many combat forces were concerned about repeal of the law. Mr. Gates replied that many of those in combat are in their early 20s, have also never served with women and have a focused, limited experience in the military.
“With time and adequate preparation, we can mitigate their concerns,” Mr. Gates said.
“I couldn’t disagree more,” Mr. McCain shot back. “We send these young people into combat, we think they’re mature enough to fight and die. I think they’re mature enough to make a judgment on who they want to serve with and the impact on their battle effectiveness.” Mr. McCain, a naval aviator in the Vietnam War who was shot down and imprisoned in Hanoi, then added: “Mr. Secretary, I speak from personal experience.”

McCain Questions Pentagon on Repealing ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

At one point, Mr. McCain sharply asked Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, whose testimony led off the Pentagon’s position, if he was not concerned that so many combat forces were concerned about repeal of the law. Mr. Gates replied that many of those in combat are in their early 20s, have also never served with women and have a focused, limited experience in the military.

“With time and adequate preparation, we can mitigate their concerns,” Mr. Gates said.

“I couldn’t disagree more,” Mr. McCain shot back. “We send these young people into combat, we think they’re mature enough to fight and die. I think they’re mature enough to make a judgment on who they want to serve with and the impact on their battle effectiveness.” Mr. McCain, a naval aviator in the Vietnam War who was shot down and imprisoned in Hanoi, then added: “Mr. Secretary, I speak from personal experience.”