Silver says he does not get on well with political reporters but is friends with media entrepreneurs such as Gawker’s Denton and Andrew Sullivan, the prominent blogger. His generation shares that entrepreneurial ambition, he says. “It used to be that you would idolise the guy who graduated at the top of his class from Harvard, and now you idolise the guy who drops out of Harvard to run a business,” he smiles.
I think the most interesting thing about Nate Silver’s move from The New York Times to ESPN is the quiet reporting from Brian Stelter that Silver will also contribute a bit to ABC News’ political coverage. … while Americans are very interested in politics from time to time, there are also vast swathes of time when they find politics totally uninteresting. … So Silver can plug away at sports coverage, and then every four years pivot back to politics … That’ll be a huge advantage for ABC News’ political team…
Matthew Yglesias, Slate
Between the pundits and the partisans, you’re dealing with a lot of very delusional people. And sports provides for much more frequent reality checks,” he wrote. “If you were touting how awesome Notre Dame was, for example, you got very much slapped back into reality last night. In politics, you can go on being delusional for years at a time.
Nate Silver participated in a Reddit “Ask Me Anything” chat today. - POLITICO
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election:

THE POLL DANCE: Nate Silver on Predicting Elections
Nate Silver turned a love of baseball into a breakout career in forecasting player performance, inventing his own statistical system for gaming the game. Then he turned his methodical eye on politics, shocking the media-polling industrial complex by correctly calling 49 of 50 states in the 2008 presidential election. He’s now the house polling analyst for the New York Times, bringing a rigorous and gnomic level of intensity to his Five Thirty Eight blog. And his well-timed new book The Signal and the Noise comes out this week, attempting to unspool the science and art of trying and/or failing to predict the future of most anything. We talked with Silver about how the 2012 race looks so far, how it might all turn out, and how this could be the year when all the predictions (including his own) go very, very wrong.
Read More

election:

THE POLL DANCE: Nate Silver on Predicting Elections

Nate Silver turned a love of baseball into a breakout career in forecasting player performance, inventing his own statistical system for gaming the game. Then he turned his methodical eye on politics, shocking the media-polling industrial complex by correctly calling 49 of 50 states in the 2008 presidential election. He’s now the house polling analyst for the New York Times, bringing a rigorous and gnomic level of intensity to his Five Thirty Eight blog. And his well-timed new book The Signal and the Noise comes out this week, attempting to unspool the science and art of trying and/or failing to predict the future of most anything. We talked with Silver about how the 2012 race looks so far, how it might all turn out, and how this could be the year when all the predictions (including his own) go very, very wrong.

Read More