bostonreview
An earlier version of this article referred incorrectly to the products sold at By Brooklyn. The store does not sell dandelion and burdock soda, lovage soda syrup, and Early Bird granola “gathered in Brooklyn.”
The Paper Of Record corrects its very timely article about this strange, new species of human being called “hipster.” (via bostonreview)
joshsternberg

joshsternberg:

I know, I know. Not a sexy topic. But…I had a lot of fun reporting this AND is actually quite important (not the story, but what the NYT is doing) for the success of the NYT.

Like many publications, The New York Times has a banner ad problem. The problem is this: the Web is littered with banners and new computer-driven methods of buying discrete audiences is putting even further pressure on the display ad market.

But unlike newfangled publications like BuzzFeed, the NYT isn’t giving up on the banner. In fact, it wants to reinvent it by giving it a heavy dose of the same tech savvy behind its recent pathbreaking interactive feature, “Snow Fall.”

Inside the NYT’s Idea Lab, a team of 10 works to save the banner ad. The lab itself is an offshoot of NYT’s R&D Lab, which was set up to come up with new technologies for storytelling. Think of the three-year-old Idea Lab as something similar, only it works with agencies and brands to help advertisers tell stories in modern, interesting ways.

Click through to read more.

matthewkeys
As for the killing of Osama bin Laden, Mr. Obama did what virtually any commander in chief would have done in the same situation. Even President Bill Clinton says in the film “that’s the call I would have made.” For this to be portrayed as the epic achievement of the first term tells you how bare the White House cupboards are.
Karl Rove: Why is everyone making a big deal out of this Osama bin Laden killing thing? [Washington Post, sourcing Wall Street Journal] (via producermatthew)
dcdecoder
dcdecoder:

Apocalypse now? Donald Trump is going to moderate a debate.
Who would show up for such a thing? Likely everybody.

Though presidential candidates may initially balk at the idea of  appearing in a debate where Mr. Trump – with his bombast and The Hair –  is the one posing the questions, they may ultimately see it as an  invitation they can’t refuse. In fact many of the candidates have  already met with him, some more publicly than others. Representative Michele Bachmann has sat down with Mr. Trump several times this year. Gov. Rick Perry of Texas had dinner with him at Jean Georges, the posh Manhattan restaurant. And Mitt Romney paid a visit but carefully avoided being photographed.
And Newsmax is a powerful player itself. It has a broad reach into the conservative base, with monthly  Web traffic second only to Fox News among sites with  conservative-leaning audiences.

dcdecoder:

Apocalypse now? Donald Trump is going to moderate a debate.

Who would show up for such a thing? Likely everybody.

Though presidential candidates may initially balk at the idea of appearing in a debate where Mr. Trump – with his bombast and The Hair – is the one posing the questions, they may ultimately see it as an invitation they can’t refuse. In fact many of the candidates have already met with him, some more publicly than others. Representative Michele Bachmann has sat down with Mr. Trump several times this year. Gov. Rick Perry of Texas had dinner with him at Jean Georges, the posh Manhattan restaurant. And Mitt Romney paid a visit but carefully avoided being photographed.

And Newsmax is a powerful player itself. It has a broad reach into the conservative base, with monthly Web traffic second only to Fox News among sites with conservative-leaning audiences.

shortformblog
shortformblog:

savvyliterate:

nerdling:ritheory:


What the fuck. 

Fucked. Up. Did some googling - Colin Moynihan is the East Village community editor for the City Room blog, whereas Al Baker, the second writer whose credit was added to the revised article, is the Times’ police bureau chief. Explains the difference in perspective; one of them wants to tell the real story and the other wants to tell it from the cops’ point of view.

Umm … You’re wrong. The first article was simply a quick pass to get something up. The second article had been cleaned up and clarified. You’re skewing the facts yourself because you’re only posting the lede of each story. 
If you scroll just a couple paragraphs later, you get the following:

But many protesters said that they thought the police had tricked and trapped them, allowing them onto the bridge and even escorting them across, only to surround them in orange netting after hundreds of them had entered.
“The cops watched and did nothing, indeed, seemed to guide us onto the roadway,” said Jesse A. Myerson, a media coordinator for Occupy Wall Street who was in the march but was not arrested.

Guess what? That’s the same thing that was posted in the first version. The reason there’s a double byline is because both reporters were pulled in to work on a huge, developing story.
I work in newspapers, and I’m pretty livid about people are skewing this and not showing the entire story. You guys know nothing about working at a paper.

Some necessary clarification on this image, currently going viral.

shortformblog:

savvyliterate:

nerdling:ritheory:

What the fuck. 

Fucked. Up. Did some googling - Colin Moynihan is the East Village community editor for the City Room blog, whereas Al Baker, the second writer whose credit was added to the revised article, is the Times’ police bureau chief. Explains the difference in perspective; one of them wants to tell the real story and the other wants to tell it from the cops’ point of view.

Umm … You’re wrong. The first article was simply a quick pass to get something up. The second article had been cleaned up and clarified. You’re skewing the facts yourself because you’re only posting the lede of each story. 

If you scroll just a couple paragraphs later, you get the following:

But many protesters said that they thought the police had tricked and trapped them, allowing them onto the bridge and even escorting them across, only to surround them in orange netting after hundreds of them had entered.

“The cops watched and did nothing, indeed, seemed to guide us onto the roadway,” said Jesse A. Myerson, a media coordinator for Occupy Wall Street who was in the march but was not arrested.

Guess what? That’s the same thing that was posted in the first version. The reason there’s a double byline is because both reporters were pulled in to work on a huge, developing story.

I work in newspapers, and I’m pretty livid about people are skewing this and not showing the entire story. You guys know nothing about working at a paper.

Some necessary clarification on this image, currently going viral.

wisconsinforward

The New Resentment of the Poor

wisconsinforward:

Representative Michele Bachmann noted recently that 47 percent of Americans do not pay federal income tax; all of them, she said, should pay something because they benefit from parks, roads and national security. (Interesting that she acknowledged government has a purpose.) Gov. Rick Perry, in the announcement of his candidacy, said he was dismayed at the “injustice” that nearly half of Americans do not pay income tax. Jon Huntsman Jr., up to now the most reasonable in the Republican presidential field, said not enough Americans pay tax.

Representative Eric Cantor, the House majority leader, and several senators have made similar arguments, variations of the idea expressed earlier by Senator Dan Coats of Indiana that “everyone needs to have some skin in the game.”

This is factually wrong, economically wrong and morally wrong. First, the facts: a vast majority of Americans have skin in the tax game. Even if they earn too little to qualify for the income tax, they pay payroll taxes (which Republicans want to raise), gasoline excise taxes and state and local taxes. Only 14 percent of households pay neither income nor payroll taxes, according to the Tax Policy Center at the Brookings Institution. The poorest fifth paid an average of 16.3 percent of income in taxes in 2010.

Economically, reducing the earned income tax credit and the child tax credit — which would be required if everyone paid income taxes — makes no sense at a time of high unemployment. The credits, which only go to working people, have always been a strong incentive to work, as even some conservative economists say, and have increased the labor force while reducing the welfare rolls.

The moral argument would have been obvious before this polarized year. Nearly 90 percent of the families that paid no income tax make less than $40,000, most much less. The real problem is that so many Americans are struggling on such a small income, not whether they pay taxes. The two tax credits lifted 7.2 million people out of poverty in 2009, including four million children. At a time when high-income households are paying their lowest share of federal taxes in decades, when corporations frequently avoid paying any tax, it is clear who should bear a larger burden and who should not.

-The New York Times.  Without a doubt, this is the best editorial I have read all year.  Read the entire piece here.

joshsternberg

Content Analysis of “Page One: Inside the New York Times”

joshsternberg:

It’s been a very long time since I wrote a critical content analysis of a film, so I decided to write one about “Page One.” A note: This is unedited and very, very long, and is not meant to be a “like it or not” review, but instead, to use a theoretical lens to discuss this particular documentary.

Watching the film was a fun and interesting challenge for me: on one hand, I read film like a text, as I sometimes like to wear a film critic’s hat; on the other, I personally know some of the ‘stars’ of the film and seeing David Carr and Brian Stelter on screen was great, but also a bit surreal.

I would imagine that any New York media person (whether journalist or PR person who has worked with any of the film’s narrators) had similar thoughts while watching this film. But to applaud the film based on knowing the social actors doesn’t do the film justice, so this ‘review’ looks at “Page One” through and expository mode of representation lens, which is meant to highlight a) how to read documentary film, b) how this film uses a the expository mode of representation to push its agenda and from that, c) can documentary film be objective?

To read the analysis, go here.