markcoatney
The image of Pike (nom de meme: the Pepper Spray Cop) isn’t the first to reach a kind of iconic status when it comes to Occupy Wall Street. (It’s not even the first to involve pepper spray. See, for example, the horrific image of 84-year-old Dorli Rainey, her face dripping with burn-assuaging milk after being sprayed in Seattle.) But it is the first whose implicit narrative — one of struggle, one of outrage — offers viewers a kind of ethical, and tacitly emotional, participation in Occupy Wall Street. A moral drama that the protestors clearly won. Images, Susan Sontag argued, are “invitations” — “to deduction, speculation, fantasy.” They invite empathy, and, with it, investment.
thedailyfeed
theweekmagazine:

The conspiracy theories of Occupy Wall Street
Perhaps nothing shows that Occupy Wall Street has hit a nerve more  than the growing number of conspiracy theories surrounding the movement.  In fact, Occupy Wall Street “seems to have done more to fuel rumors  than it has to end corporate greed.”  Here, five of the most head-scratching, pervasive conspiracy theories  swirling around the protests — and how critics answer them

theweekmagazine:

The conspiracy theories of Occupy Wall Street

Perhaps nothing shows that Occupy Wall Street has hit a nerve more than the growing number of conspiracy theories surrounding the movement. In fact, Occupy Wall Street “seems to have done more to fuel rumors than it has to end corporate greed.” Here, five of the most head-scratching, pervasive conspiracy theories swirling around the protests — and how critics answer them

At Zuccotti Park, the Mystery of the ‘Hipster Cop’ 
He has become an instant local celebrity and a fascination of online coverage. Blogs anointed him the “hipster cop’’ and mused about his identity. Twitter users posted snapshots of him. Online sleuths matched the snapshots to those of a community affairs detective in the First Precinct named Rick Lee.
Now it can be told: the officer is indeed Detective Lee, who confessed when approached by a reporter at the park.
“That’s what they call me,” he said with a slightly exasperated sigh.
“I will reveal that I wear skinny jeans off-duty,” he said, adding that the department frowns upon wearing them on-duty.
More —> NYTimes

At Zuccotti Park, the Mystery of the ‘Hipster Cop’ 

He has become an instant local celebrity and a fascination of online coverage. Blogs anointed him the “hipster cop’’ and mused about his identity. Twitter users posted snapshots of him. Online sleuths matched the snapshots to those of a community affairs detective in the First Precinct named Rick Lee.

Now it can be told: the officer is indeed Detective Lee, who confessed when approached by a reporter at the park.

“That’s what they call me,” he said with a slightly exasperated sigh.

“I will reveal that I wear skinny jeans off-duty,” he said, adding that the department frowns upon wearing them on-duty.

More —> NYTimes

theatlantic

Feminist author Naomi Wolf was arrested in New York outside an event that was awarding Gov. Andrew Cuomo. According to The Guardian’s account of the incident, there was around 50 Occupy Wall Street protesters who were gathered outside Skylight Studios to demonstrate against Cuomo’s opposition to a millionaires tax while he was inside being honored by the Huffington Post with a “Game Changer of the Year Award.” The police were apparently trying to keep the sidewalks clear. Read more.