thisismybyline

How to win followers and influence journalism: lessons from journalists with the most followers on Twitter

muckrack:

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Anderson Cooper is the most followed broadcast journalist on Twitter. Wonder how he and the others who made the list do it?

Elizabeth Breese analyzed the habits of the most followed journos on Twitter. 

Click over to the Muck Rack blog to see what she found.

fastcompany
fastcompany:

"Underlapse" Takes You To A Dizzying World Of Antigravity
Imagine that down is up, and up is down. Everywhere you go, there are limitless expanses of sky unfurling beneath you. It’s terrifying and disorienting, like a dream. It’s also something you can watch right now.
Underlapse is a visual head trip that stimulates your brain by mixing up traditional spatial cues. 
Watch>

fastcompany:

"Underlapse" Takes You To A Dizzying World Of Antigravity

Imagine that down is up, and up is down. Everywhere you go, there are limitless expanses of sky unfurling beneath you. It’s terrifying and disorienting, like a dream. It’s also something you can watch right now.

Underlapse is a visual head trip that stimulates your brain by mixing up traditional spatial cues. 

Watch>

fastcompany

fastcompany:

The Slums Of Liberia Spring To Life In These Animated GIFs

What makes an animated GIF so compelling isn’t just that it’s an image in motion; it’s that it’s cyclical. It loops, and anything caught within it becomes like a gear. In a way, what makes a GIF so satisfying is that its endless motion is almost like an elaboration upon the machinery of life.

This is the aspect of the animated GIF that French photographer François Beaurain explores in Monrovia Animated, a new series of looping images that explore life in the capitol of Liberia. In his GIFs, Beaurain juxtaposes the static dilapidation of the impoverished capitol with the colorful and repetitive energy of its citizens, turning them into “a piece of the conveyor belt that animates the city.”

Read More>

soupsoup
We’re at ‘peak photographer’ at the moment. There is an entire idiot class of professional photographer who seem to believe they’re creating something essential every time they pick up a camera. It’s not the photographer’s fault. I blame the creative directors who commission them. There are way too many photographs in the world. Think of how many pictures have been taken all over the world in the time you’ve read this article – even this sentence. This is another sentence I’ve just typed, so that’s like a ton more. All these images multiplying and multiplying. All those shitty pictures of cats and beautiful sunsets that sit dying in the corner of your smart phone, shared with the hope of being liked by people who all have the same thousand pictures hiding on their phone. All these forgettable memories. I don’t see that’s much different from the endless stream of boring fashion pictures, boring travel pictures, boring still lifes of food that are commissioned by magazines, ad agencies, marketing firms. For every Juergen Teller there are a million Terry Richardsons. So let’s just stop. Or just use what’s there already. Or at least think about it. Sorry I’ve lost my thread. What was the question again?