fastcompany
fastcompany:

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."
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fastcompany:

You may have seen the viral video “Old Man In Nursing Home Reacts To Music.” Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett talks about that moment and his documentary about reaching through dementia with music.

image

"Our film addresses some subjects people don’t like to talk about, yet it’s a joyous experience because we show that people suffering from memory loss still have this life inside that runs incredibly deep."

Read More>

I love this story. 

fastcompany
fastcompany:

“Climate Name Change” Turns Delusional Politicians Into Natural Disasters
To bring attention to the widespread apathy toward climate change, nonprofit group 350action and agency Barton F. Graf 9000 got a little personal. Tapping into the meteorological legacy of naming hurricanes after people — thereby marring the good names of unsuspecting Sandys, Irenes and Katrinas everywhere — “Climate Name Change” told the same storm story, but subbed in the name of prominent politicians who refuse to acknowledge climate change. So instead of citizen anger being directed at a whirl of wind and rain named Sandy, people could direct their ire at Michelle Bachman, a known climate change denier. The result is deadpan and absurd, but pointed in its attack.
Watch>

fastcompany:

“Climate Name Change” Turns Delusional Politicians Into Natural Disasters

To bring attention to the widespread apathy toward climate change, nonprofit group 350action and agency Barton F. Graf 9000 got a little personal. Tapping into the meteorological legacy of naming hurricanes after people — thereby marring the good names of unsuspecting Sandys, Irenes and Katrinas everywhere — “Climate Name Change” told the same storm story, but subbed in the name of prominent politicians who refuse to acknowledge climate change. So instead of citizen anger being directed at a whirl of wind and rain named Sandy, people could direct their ire at Michelle Bachman, a known climate change denier. The result is deadpan and absurd, but pointed in its attack.

Watch>

parislemon

parislemon:

Dennis Overbye on the news that scientists have discovered the gravity waves that are likely a sign that the theory of early universe inflation is correct:

Under some circumstances, a glass of water can stay liquid as the temperature falls below 32 degrees, until it is disturbed, at which point it will rapidly freeze, releasing latent heat.

Similarly, the universe could “supercool” and stay in a unified state too long. In that case, space itself would become imbued with a mysterious latent energy.

Inserted into Einstein’s equations, the latent energy would act as a kind of antigravity, and the universe would blow itself up. Since it was space itself supplying the repulsive force, the more space was created, the harder it pushed apart.

What would become our observable universe mushroomed in size at least a trillion trillionfold — from a submicroscopic speck of primordial energy to the size of a grapefruit — in less than a cosmic eye-blink.

But things get really crazy when you consider that this could theoretically also be true for an infinite amount of universes beyond our own, the “multiverse”.

ted

ted:

The amazing problem-solving skills of crows — measured by science!

Here, one of these smarty-pants birds is being put to the ultimate test: get a basket of food out of an upright cylinder with a single straight wire. And get it she does, in a feat of intuitive problem solving.

Want to know why crows are so smart? Check out this talk from TEDxRainier by bird researcher John Marzluff, on the wildly fascinating intricacies of the bird brain. (Take that one out of your insult bucket.)

Watch the talk here » 

P.S. Do not skip 14:38, when you get to hear a crow speak English.

fastcompany

ted:

To really understand climate change, we need to see the big picture. This beautiful globe is an animated climate model, made to help scientists figure out what the eff is going on.

This particular model (which you can see in all its mesmerizing glory at 8:33) shows many atmospheric particles moving around the globe. The reddish-orange is dust streaming off the Sahara; the white is pollution from burning coal and volcanoes; the red dots are fires; and the blue swirls are sea salt whipped into the air by the wind.

All those swirling particles affect our climate. “There are so many different factors at work,” says climate scientist Gavin Schmidt"Everything from how light travels through the atmosphere to how the winds move the ocean around to how rain hits the ground has an effect on what actually happens on Earth both now and in the future."

Watch the full talk here »