Posts Tagged "Science"

fastcompany:

Mind Reading Comes One Step Closer To Reality With The Glass Brain

What if you could see inside someone’s mind? It’s not possible to know exactly what another person is thinking, but neuroscientists from UCSD and UCSF are on their way. They created a “glass brain”: software that shows a person’s brain reacting to stimuli in real time. The implications for virtual reality and digital communication are tremendous, according to Philip Rosedale, the founder of Second Life, who has been collaborating with the neuroscientists.

“We’re trying to identify which critical factors can most help people feel like they’re face to face,” says Rosedale, whose new company, High Fidelity, is currently working on a next generation virtual world.

More> Co.Create

futurejournalismproject:

How to Remember Anything (runtime ~20 minutes)

For those who have never seen it: a totally useful Ted Talk by science journalist Joshua Foer (who is also the founder of the absolutely awesome Atlas Obscura). He talks about covering the U.S. Memory Championships where he learned how humans can train their brains to remember a lot in a little bit of time. But more importantly, he talks about why we ought to strengthen our memory in an age when one can outsource the storage of most information to the web.

Related: Last year, Clive Thompson published a fascinating book about how technology is changing the way we think (mostly for the better). Maria Popova reviewed it on Brain Pickings, covering some of his most important observations, namely: the difference in transparency between traditional public storehouses of information (i.e.: the public library) and modern storehouses (i.e.: the web). And in this context, we wrote a bit about the perils of algorithmic curation.

Scientists have grown the first mini human brains in a laboratory and say their success could lead to new levels of understanding about the way brains develop and what goes wrong in disorders like schizophrenia and autism.

Read> Reuters

fastcodesign:

Watch The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” From Outer Space
John Nelson is known for building extremely complex visualizations of weather patterns. But his latest creation is a simple animated GIF of 15 frames from NASA’s cloudless satellite photography collection. It’s essentially a year in the life of Earth.
Here, he shares why the visual is so haunting to him personally and to us collectively. We felt that his thoughts were simply too earnest to abridge.
Read: Co.Design

fastcodesign:

Watch The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” From Outer Space

John Nelson is known for building extremely complex visualizations of weather patterns. But his latest creation is a simple animated GIF of 15 frames from NASA’s cloudless satellite photography collection. It’s essentially a year in the life of Earth.

Here, he shares why the visual is so haunting to him personally and to us collectively. We felt that his thoughts were simply too earnest to abridge.

Read: Co.Design

(via beerburritowhiskey)

inothernews:

HOW MARS GOT ITS GROOVES BACK   Dubbed linear gullies, these long grooves appear on the sides of some sandy slopes during Martian spring.  They have nearly constant widths, extend for as long as two kilometers, and have raised banks along their sides. Unlike most water flows, they do not appear to have areas of dried debris at the downhill end. A leading hypothesis — actually being tested here on Earth — is that these linear gullies are caused by chunks of dry ice breaking off and sliding down hills while sublimating into gas, eventually completely evaporating into thin air.  Or, there are aliens.  Aliens on Mars.  And these are the tracks of their peers.  (Photo: HiRISEMROLPL (U. Arizona) via NASA APOD)

“It symbolizes that so far we have failed miserably in tackling this problem.”

The level of the most important heat-trapping gas in the atmosphere, carbon dioxide, has passed a long-feared milestone, scientists reported on Friday, reaching a concentration not seen on the earth for millions of years.

Read: Carbon Dioxide Level Passes Long-Feared Milestone - NYTimes