jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

Artificial intelligence will be the future of finding fossil sites
The next Indiana Jones will have to be a hell of a programmer.

Lucy, the famous Australopithecus afarensis skeleton, was found by accident when palaeoanthropologist Donald Johanson took a detour back to his Land Rover in Ethiopia in 1974. Such luck will always have a place in fossil hunting, but artificial intelligence now promises to assist, after a team trained a computer neural network to recognize fossil sites in satellite images.

(via Nature News, photo by Bill Thompson)

jtotheizzoe:

Artificial intelligence will be the future of finding fossil sites

The next Indiana Jones will have to be a hell of a programmer.

Lucy, the famous Australopithecus afarensis skeleton, was found by accident when palaeoanthropologist Donald Johanson took a detour back to his Land Rover in Ethiopia in 1974. Such luck will always have a place in fossil hunting, but artificial intelligence now promises to assist, after a team trained a computer neural network to recognize fossil sites in satellite images.

(via Nature News, photo by Bill Thompson)

sunfoundation

sunfoundation:

Kill Math makes math more meaningful

After a certain point in math education, like some time during high school, the relevance of the concepts to the everyday and the real world seem to fade. However, in many ways, math lets you describe real life better than you can with just words. Designer Bret Victor hopes to make the abstract and conceptual to real and concrete with Kill Math.

braiker
utnereader:

(via Designboom)

In a device platform that spans communications, human-machine interfaces and gaming, and medical diagnostics, ultrathin electronics can be worn as simply and unobtrusively as a  temporary tattoo with the system developed by a research team led by Todd Coleman and John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Yonggang Huang of Northwestern University. Sensors and communication electronics are embedded into flexible transparent sheets that stick to skin. The unobtrusive quality of the device opens the potential for a host of measurements and control systems that could offer more accurate day-to-day data than laboratory figures (when patients are in unnatural conditions), while the use of other kinds of electronic modules permits covert communications and physiological-directed gaming.

utnereader:

(via Designboom)

In a device platform that spans communications, human-machine interfaces and gaming, and medical diagnostics, ultrathin electronics can be worn as simply and unobtrusively as a temporary tattoo with the system developed by a research team led by Todd Coleman and John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Yonggang Huang of Northwestern University. Sensors and communication electronics are embedded into flexible transparent sheets that stick to skin. The unobtrusive quality of the device opens the potential for a host of measurements and control systems that could offer more accurate day-to-day data than laboratory figures (when patients are in unnatural conditions), while the use of other kinds of electronic modules permits covert communications and physiological-directed gaming.

shortformblog

shortformblog:

Lion will only be available in the App store, meaning you can’t install it with a disc. That also means that it’s easy to upgrade and update. Much like Snow Leopard, it’s only going to be $29.99. Unlike Snow Leopard, it’ll only take up 4 gb of hard drive space. Not bad. Some of our favorite new…