Aaron Sorkin is why people hate liberals. He’s a smug, condescending know-it-all who isn’t as smart as he thinks he is. His feints toward open-mindedness are transparently phony, he mistakes his opinion for common sense, and he’s preachy. Sorkin has spent years fueling the delusional self-regard of well-educated liberals. He might be more responsible than anyone else for the anti-democratic “everyone would agree with us if they weren’t all so stupid” attitude of the contemporary progressive movement. And age is not improving him.
Read: Salon

Aaron Sorkin is why people hate liberals. He’s a smug, condescending know-it-all who isn’t as smart as he thinks he is. His feints toward open-mindedness are transparently phony, he mistakes his opinion for common sense, and he’s preachy. Sorkin has spent years fueling the delusional self-regard of well-educated liberals. He might be more responsible than anyone else for the anti-democratic “everyone would agree with us if they weren’t all so stupid” attitude of the contemporary progressive movement. And age is not improving him.

Read: Salon

I’m unable to, and I’ll tell you why. Less than an hour after the press release went out toward the end of season four [announcing] that Tommy Schlamme, our principal director, and I would be leaving the show, Larry David called me. I’d only met him a couple of times, we’d shaken hands. Larry had left Seinfeld early. And he called me and said, “You can never watch the show again. Either it’s going to be great, and you’re going to be miserable, or it’s going to be less than great, and you’re going to be miserable. But either way, you’re going to be miserable.” I thanked him for his advice, but I thought, you know, Larry’s kind of professionally miserable. So, the day before the season-five premiere aired, a copy was messengered to me. I stuck the tape in, and I did not get even 60 seconds into it before I had to shut it off. Not because it was great, not because it was less than great, but because it was like watching somebody make out with my girlfriend. Other than those 60 seconds, which I can’t even really recall, I’ve never seen seasons five through seven. I missed it terribly when I left. But it was the right thing to do.
amandahess
Most guys, we can recite all of The Godfather, we can recite all of Caddyshack, we can do those kinds of things. Women, by and large, can’t. You guys can say “you complete me”, and that’s about it. And I think it’s because in the history of movies, there have been fewer quotable lines spoken by actresses than actors.

- Aaron Sorkin (follow and join the #LadiesinFilm tag on Twitter to prove him wrong with quotable lines from women across film history). #geenadavis4eva (via nonaswriting)

I have two words for you, Sorkin: AS IF

(via amandahess)

Must watch. Excellent Stephen Colbert - Aaron Sorkin of ‘The Social Network’ interview.

Colbert: Now this Zuckerburg guy might come after you with a haymaker because you portray him as something of a genius jerk.

Sorkin: Right, I’m not worried about the haymaker, I’m worried about an entire building of people who know how to hack into my hard drive and put child porn there. 

Colbert goes after Sorkin for the way women are portrayed in the movie:

[Besides Zuckerburg’s main love interest] the other girls in the movie don’t have as much to say because they’re high or drunk or blowing guys in the bathroom. Why are there no other women, of any substance in the movie?

Sorkin: That’s a fair question…