In other cases, an employee was charged with DUI for the second time, one used a lost or stolen credit card to buy gas, and another was caught in a child pornography sting operation, according to the internal reports. …

"As long I’ve been doing this … there are days when I think ‘OK, I’ve seen it all,’ but I really haven’t," FBI assistant director Candice Will said. "I still get files and I think, ‘Wow, I never would have thought of that.’"
shortformblog

shortformblog:

The FBI also released a similar warning when U.S. forces killed Osama bin Laden. In related news, the guy who designed the underwear bomber’s underwear bomb was likely also killed in the strike that killed al-Awlaki.

The FBI has agreed to meet with the families of 9/11 victims to investigate allegations of phone hacking in the United States.

According to a lawyer for one such family, relatives of 9/11 victims are scheduled to meet with FBI director Robert Mueller and the U.S. attorney general Eric Holder to discuss the allegations, CNN reported on Wednesday. No specific date has been set for the meeting, the lawyer said.

Several lawmakers have pressed Holder to launch an investigation into News Corp.’s operations, after allegations about the paper’s hacking of 9/11 victims’ families surfaced in the U.K.’s Daily Mirror. The FBI investigation was launched late last week.
FBI to meet with 9/11 families in News Corp. phone hacking investigation, plus more fallout from Murdoch hearing - The Cutline
futurejournalismproject

futurejournalismproject:

Yesterday we noted that the Center for Public Integrity uncovered a memo revealing that the FBI used an ABC journalist as a confidant during the 1990s.

Today, the New York Times runs a story where Christopher Isham, the journalist in question and now an executive at CBS, denounced the accusation as ““outrageous and untrue.”

Via the New York Times:

Like every investigative reporter, my job for 25 years has been to check out information and tips from sources,” Mr. Isham said in a statement released through a CBS spokeswoman. “In the heat of the Oklahoma City bombing, it would not be unusual for me or any journalist to run information by a source within the F.B.I. for confirmation or to notify authorities about a pending terrorist attack.”…

…One of Mr. Isham’s former colleagues said Tuesday that there was “tremendous pressure” for F.B.I. agents to recruit informants in the wake of the Oklahoma City bombing and noted that being considered an F.B.I. source did not necessarily mean a person was a willing informant.

A senior ABC News journalist served as an informant to the FBI during its investigation into the Oklahoma City bombing…

The FBI was interested because journalist had gotten a wild and ultimately unconfirmed tip that Iraqi Special Services had had something to do with the bombing.

[…]

ABC News spokesman Jeffrey Schneider couldn’t not confirm the identity of the journalist, but said by the description in the memo, that person is no longer with the network.

Schneider explained why this sort of thing gives journalists a cold chill.

“If true, it would certainly be of grave concern to us that the FBI would have created an informant file based on information gleaned from a reporter,” Schneider said. “It certainly would be very troubling for the FBI to recruit a news employee as a confidential source.”
“It can create a perception of collusion between the government and the news organization. It would put journalists everywhere at risk if people believed that journalists are acting as government agents. And it could raise the specter of the government trying to spy on a news organization,” he added.
The unforgiving lens of history
Through Ernest C. Withers’ lens, many of us were introduced, visually, to African-Americans’ struggle for civil rights in the 1950s and 1960s — even my generation, who saw Withers’ photos of Memphis sanitation workers holding signs saying "I AM A MAN" in a history book, causing us to puff our chests out a little further that day.
In many ways, Withers — who died in 2007 at age 85 — was a hero to me. This morning, I am heartbroken. I find it hard to consider someone a hero when he informed on the Civil Rights leaders who considered him in their confidence, and did it for money. Ernest C. Withers was a paid informant to the F.B.I. - Jamil Smith
Continue reading… MaddowBlog

The unforgiving lens of history

Through Ernest C. Withers’ lens, many of us were introduced, visually, to African-Americans’ struggle for civil rights in the 1950s and 1960s — even my generation, who saw Withers’ photos of Memphis sanitation workers holding signs saying "I AM A MAN" in a history book, causing us to puff our chests out a little further that day.

In many ways, Withers — who died in 2007 at age 85 — was a hero to me. This morning, I am heartbroken. I find it hard to consider someone a hero when he informed on the Civil Rights leaders who considered him in their confidence, and did it for money. Ernest C. Withers was a paid informant to the F.B.I. - Jamil Smith

Continue reading… MaddowBlog

In May of 2004, Vice President Dick Cheney was questioned by federal investigators about his role in the leak of Valerie Plame’s identity. Today, in response to a court order resulting from a suit brought by CREW, notes from that interview were finally released.

Here is the interview transcript (PDF).

Leak investigation notes can be found here and here. (Both PDFs)

firedoglake