fastcompany
fastcompany:

Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.
Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Quotacle lets users search through over 250,000 lines of dialogue from 143 movies.

Everybody knows what the first and second rules of Fight Club are. Ditto the identity of Luke’s father. Sometimes, however, a bit of dialogue drops from someone’s lips and just hangs there in your ear canal, undiagnosed. Neither the title of the film nor the context in which this line was uttered break through the clatter of your overwhelmed modern-day brain. Googling might’ve helped, but it also might not have. Instead, this is a job for the movie quote search engine—a thing that now exists.

Read More>

kickstarter
kickstarter:

“I think Aaron’s story is compelling for lots of different reasons. My previous film We Are Legion followed hackers and activists, so I was following Aaron’s story right from when he was arrested. He was so deeply engaged in so many issues that are really relevant about information, our relationship with information, the way the Internet is changing, and the freedoms of the Internet. And then I was struck by how much his story resonated with people far beyond the communities in which he was a celebrity—people that didn’t even know him.” 
—Brian Knappenberger, director of The Internet’s Own Boy, on Aaron Swartz. Read the rest of the Q&A and watch the new trailer, over here.

kickstarter:

I think Aaron’s story is compelling for lots of different reasons. My previous film We Are Legion followed hackers and activists, so I was following Aaron’s story right from when he was arrested. He was so deeply engaged in so many issues that are really relevant about information, our relationship with information, the way the Internet is changing, and the freedoms of the Internet. And then I was struck by how much his story resonated with people far beyond the communities in which he was a celebrity—people that didn’t even know him.”

—Brian Knappenberger, director of The Internet’s Own Boy, on Aaron Swartz. Read the rest of the Q&A and watch the new trailer, over here.

nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

Tom Hanks and director Paul Greengrass tell Fresh Air’s Dave Davies about filming the pirate attack scene in Captain Phillips: 

Greengrass: I didn’t want them to have become friends because in the end the job was to come through that door and terrorize and threaten and be believable. So we kept them apart, and it’s sort of the trick you play, I’m afraid, when you’re a director. You’re trying to create moments that everybody is looking forward to in a shoot … something that’s two, three weeks down the road where everybody is going, “That’s going to be an exciting day when those two groups meet each other.” And I think it got everybody excited, and there was a good tension in the air.
Hanks: We had seen little dots on the horizon because they had been working on the skiffs far away … it was tense. We were scared in the best way possible because we know the guns aren’t loaded, but those guys … came in pumped up with all of the anxiety of being there in the first place, and all the expertise they had learned, all the work they had done, so … when they blew that door open and came in screaming at us, I saw four of the skinniest, scariest human beings on the planet and the hair did stand up on the back of our heads. It was chaotic. It seemed like the rules had gone right out the window. In one way, we’re just trying to survive the scene.

The film is now nominated for 6 Academy Awards 
Actors: Barkhad Abdi (left), Hanks, and Faysal Ahmed 
image via the knowledge online

nprfreshair:

Tom Hanks and director Paul Greengrass tell Fresh Air’s Dave Davies about filming the pirate attack scene in Captain Phillips

Greengrass: I didn’t want them to have become friends because in the end the job was to come through that door and terrorize and threaten and be believable. So we kept them apart, and it’s sort of the trick you play, I’m afraid, when you’re a director. You’re trying to create moments that everybody is looking forward to in a shoot … something that’s two, three weeks down the road where everybody is going, “That’s going to be an exciting day when those two groups meet each other.” And I think it got everybody excited, and there was a good tension in the air.

Hanks: We had seen little dots on the horizon because they had been working on the skiffs far away … it was tense. We were scared in the best way possible because we know the guns aren’t loaded, but those guys … came in pumped up with all of the anxiety of being there in the first place, and all the expertise they had learned, all the work they had done, so … when they blew that door open and came in screaming at us, I saw four of the skinniest, scariest human beings on the planet and the hair did stand up on the back of our heads. It was chaotic. It seemed like the rules had gone right out the window. In one way, we’re just trying to survive the scene.

The film is now nominated for 6 Academy Awards 

Actors: Barkhad Abdi (left), Hanks, and Faysal Ahmed 

image via the knowledge online

parislemon

parislemon:

Mark Seal, looking back at the making of Pulp Fiction on its 20th anniversary, for Vanity Fair:

Just seven years earlier, in 1986, Tarantino was a 23-year-old part-time actor and high-school dropout, broke, without an apartment of his own, showering rarely. With no agent, he sent out scripts that never got past low-level readers. “Too vile, too vulgar, too violent” was the usual reaction, he later said. According to Quentin Tarantino, by Wensley Clarkson, his constant use of the f-word in his script True Romance caused one studio rep to write to Cathryn Jaymes, his early manager:

Dear Fucking Cathryn,

How dare you send me this fucking piece of shit. You must be out of your fucking mind. You want to know how I feel about it? Here’s your fucking piece of shit back. Fuck you.

A brilliant fucking retrospective.