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FRONTLINE : The Man Who Knew

“We don’t know what would have happened if John could have done his job in Yemen and had really had the full back-up to go and to really push in Yemen and what kind of networks he could have exposed. But you know, we do know there were Yemenis involved in the attacks of September 11th. So is it possible that if he had been able to really open up that network and really expose that network, that he could have in some way deterred the tragedy of September 11th? I don’t think we know, but it’s sad because we won’t know the answer to that. But I think there is a fighting — he would have had had a fighting chance if he’d been able to do his job.” - Chris Isham, ABC News

John O’Neill wound up leaving the FBI and went to work, of all places, as head of security at the World Trade Center, and was one of the victims of the attack on 9/11

"A clear-cut & classic" case of child abuse. Or was it? Preview our co-invstg w/ @ProPublica & @NPR  @PBS 6/28 - @frontlinepbs

When a child dies under suspicious circumstances, abuse is often suspected. That’s what happened in the case of six-month-old Isis Vas, whose death was deemed “a clear-cut and classic” case of child abuse, sending a man named Ernie Lopez to prison for 60 years. But now a Texas judge has moved to overturn Lopez’s conviction, and new questions are being asked about the quality of expert testimony in this and many other similar cases. In this joint investigation with ProPublica and NPR, FRONTLINE correspondent A.C. Thompson unearths more than 20 child death cases in which people were jailed on medical evidence — involving abuse, assault and “shaken-baby syndrome” — that was later found unreliable or flat-out wrong. Are death investigators being properly trained for child cases? The Child Cases is the first of three magazine segments airing June 28 at 9 p.m

9 P.M. (PBS or Online) FRONTLINE: WIKISECRETS 

In this “Frontline” episode, Martin Smith tells the story of WikiLeaks through interviews with Julian Assange, the Internet activist who published more than half a million classified documents in the spring of 2010, and with the father of Pfc. Bradley E. Manning, the Army intelligence analyst accused of handing them over. - NYTimes

'Frontline': The Best News Program on Television
[I]n my view, the best news program on television is Frontline, the PBS series that has been on the air since 1983 and has produced 530 documentaries (a total of 640 hours of programming) with consistent quality, technical skill, and provocative intent. And yet compared to programs that offer much less of substance, Frontline, with a weekly audience of 2.7 million, seems far less visible than it deserves. Aside from its regular slots on virtually all PBS stations, Frontline maintains one of the outstanding websites on the Internet. Right now, you can watch 107 full hours of Frontline programs, each supplemented with additional material intended to provide context and depth to what is on the air.
Frontline was created in 1983 by David Fanning, who as executive producer has led a small Boston-based team (housed at WGBH) that has won more awards than any other program staff in television history. Okay, I can’t prove that to be the case, but it takes nine pages to print out the prizes, including, uniquely, a 2003 Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service in recognition of its collaboration with the New York Times on a devastating portrait of workplace hazards. The full roster includes 45 Emmys, 24 duPont-Columbia University Awards (including two Gold Batons for its “total contribution to the world of exceptional television”), 13 Peabody Awards, and 11 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism awards, as well as scores of others.
Continue reading… Peter Osnos, TheAtlantic

'Frontline': The Best News Program on Television

[I]n my view, the best news program on television is Frontline, the PBS series that has been on the air since 1983 and has produced 530 documentaries (a total of 640 hours of programming) with consistent quality, technical skill, and provocative intent. And yet compared to programs that offer much less of substance, Frontline, with a weekly audience of 2.7 million, seems far less visible than it deserves. Aside from its regular slots on virtually all PBS stations, Frontline maintains one of the outstanding websites on the Internet. Right now, you can watch 107 full hours of Frontline programs, each supplemented with additional material intended to provide context and depth to what is on the air.

Frontline was created in 1983 by David Fanning, who as executive producer has led a small Boston-based team (housed at WGBH) that has won more awards than any other program staff in television history. Okay, I can’t prove that to be the case, but it takes nine pages to print out the prizes, including, uniquely, a 2003 Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal for Public Service in recognition of its collaboration with the New York Times on a devastating portrait of workplace hazards. The full roster includes 45 Emmys, 24 duPont-Columbia University Awards (including two Gold Batons for its “total contribution to the world of exceptional television”), 13 Peabody Awards, and 11 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism awards, as well as scores of others.

Continue reading… Peter Osnos, TheAtlantic

9 P.M. (PBS) Frontline 

FIGHTING FOR AL QAEDA Produced before Sunday night’s announcement that Osama bin Laden had been killed by United States special forces, this “Frontline” edition follows the journalist Najibullah Quraishi deep into Afghanistan as he meets with militants and foreign fighters loyal to Bin Laden. Martin Smith discusses the future of Al Qaeda with Peter Bergen, a terror expert.

11 P.M. (COM) The Daily Show: Rachel Maddow

11:30 P.M. (COM) The Colbert Report: NY Jets Head Coach Rex Ryan

I want you to put this on the screen in big, bold letters — dead people don’t vote.

Coroner Frank Minyard. Frontline: Post Mortem - Death Investigation In America 

Popular television shows portray death investigators as high-tech sleuths wielding the most sophisticated tools of 21st century science. An unprecedented collaborative investigation by FRONTLINE, ProPublica and NPR found a very different reality: A dysfunctional system in which there are few standards, little oversight and the mistakes are literally buried. In state after state, reporters found autopsies — our final physical exam — conducted by doctors who lacked certification and training. An increasing number of the 2.5 million Americans who die each year go to the grave without being examined at all.  - Watch here