Here’s, I think, an important and pretty cool story I wrote for Fast Company yesterday:
While other non-reusable syringes can cost 200% more than standard syringes, the ABCs (A Behaviour Changing Syringe) cost approximately four cents, only 1% more than the standard syringes. … Dr. David Swann tested the ABCs in India, and found that 100% of men, women, and children (both literate and illiterate) correctly identified the red syringe to be dangerous.
Read> This Color-Changing Syringe Could Save Millions Of Lives - Fast Company

Here’s, I think, an important and pretty cool story I wrote for Fast Company yesterday:

While other non-reusable syringes can cost 200% more than standard syringes, the ABCs (A Behaviour Changing Syringe) cost approximately four cents, only 1% more than the standard syringes. … Dr. David Swann tested the ABCs in India, and found that 100% of men, women, and children (both literate and illiterate) correctly identified the red syringe to be dangerous.

Read> This Color-Changing Syringe Could Save Millions Of Lives - Fast Company

It didn’t matter if their significant other was an excellent hostess or intelligent, men were more likely to feel subconsciously worse about themselves when their female partner succeeded than when she failed, according to the study published online in the APA Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. However, women’s self-esteem was not affected by their male partners’ successes or failures, according to the research, which looked at heterosexual Americans and Dutch.
Assuming that events that happen at the same time are connected can lead to serious misconceptions: over the last decade, for example the rise in sales of organic food in the United States has mirrored the growth in autism rates almost exactly. No sane person would suggest that those facts are related. - Michael Specter, The New Yorker
[T]he marketing efforts of Big Pharma on TV and elsewhere have a huge influence over which diagnoses become fashionable. Some commentators have noted that shifts in diagnostic trends seem uncannily timed to coincide with the term lengths of the patents that pharmaceutical companies hold on drugs. Is it a coincidence that the diagnosis of anxiety diminished as the patents on tranquilizers ran out? Or that the diagnosis of depression rose as drug companies landed new exclusive rights to sell various antidepressants? Consider for a moment that the diagnosis of depression didn’t become popular in Japan until Glaxo-SmithKlein got approval to market Paxil in the country.