thenewrepublic
thenewrepublic:

How did Jeffrey Toobin keep up the “train wreck” echo chamber?
“There are two ways to explain the early onset of liberal panic over last week’s health care hearings at the Supreme Court. In the first, Solicitor General Don Verrilli turned in an unexpectedly weak performance during last Tuesday’s oral arguments, flubbing tough questions from the court’s skeptical swing votes. In the second, New Yorker writer and CNN legal correspondent Jeffrey Toobin got on television and scared the hell out of all of us.”
- Simon van Zuylen-Wood, Jeffrey Toobin’s Big Week
Photo courtesy of The Charlie Rose Show

thenewrepublic:

How did Jeffrey Toobin keep up the “train wreck” echo chamber?

“There are two ways to explain the early onset of liberal panic over last week’s health care hearings at the Supreme Court. In the first, Solicitor General Don Verrilli turned in an unexpectedly weak performance during last Tuesday’s oral arguments, flubbing tough questions from the court’s skeptical swing votes. In the second, New Yorker writer and CNN legal correspondent Jeffrey Toobin got on television and scared the hell out of all of us.”

- Simon van Zuylen-Wood, Jeffrey Toobin’s Big Week

Photo courtesy of The Charlie Rose Show

thenewrepublic
thenewrepublic:

Could one simple argument have saved Obamacare? Jeffrey Rosen and Jonathan Cohn discuss the Supreme Court case.“In the oral arguments over the constitutionality of health care reform, John Roberts and Anthony Kennedy seemed at times to be looking for a reason to uphold the law despite their doubts. Unfortunately, Solicitor General Donald Verrilli didn’t give it to them.”-Jeffrey Rosen, One Simple Argument Could Have Saved Obamacare. Too Bad Verilli Didn’t Make It.

thenewrepublic:

Could one simple argument have saved Obamacare? Jeffrey Rosen and Jonathan Cohn discuss the Supreme Court case.

“In the oral arguments over the constitutionality of health care reform, John Roberts and Anthony Kennedy seemed at times to be looking for a reason to uphold the law despite their doubts. Unfortunately, Solicitor General Donald Verrilli didn’t give it to them.”

-Jeffrey Rosen, One Simple Argument Could Have Saved Obamacare. Too Bad Verilli Didn’t Make It.

nprfreshair
There’s been some change in my views about the death penalty, but I think there’s more of a change in the jurisprudence of the Court that made me eventually reach the conclusion that the death penalty, as it is presently administered, is unconstitutional.
Justice John Paul Stevens voted to uphold the death penalty in 1976. On today’s Fresh Air, he discusses his evolving viewpoints over his 35 years on the Supreme Court.  (via nprfreshair)

savingpaper:

This is big news:

Beginning with the October Term 2010, the audio recordings of all oral arguments heard by the Supreme Court of the United States will be available free to the public on the Court’s web site, www.supremecourt.gov, at the end of each argument week. The audio recordings will be posted on Fridays after Conference.

The public may either download the audio files or listen to the recordings on the Court’s website. The MP3 files of the audio recordings may be accessed by clicking the “Oral Arguments” prompt on the home page, and selecting “Argument Audio.” The audio recordings will be listed by case name, docket number, and date of oral argument.

This is not as nice as same-day release, and nowhere near televising the arguments, but it’s a big step forward for the Court, scholars, amateur buffs, and the media. Previously the Court only released recordings of oral arguments to the National Archives at the end of each term, and if you didn’t have access to the National Archives, you had to wait until The Oyez Project could upload the arguments on its website. (And that wait could be a while: last term’s oral arguments still aren’t available.)

Now anyone with Internet access can become more knowledgeable of the Court and its workings.