climateadaptation

climateadaptation:

Allan Savory: How to green the world’s deserts and reverse climate change

Not at all what I expected. For just over half his talk, Savory discusses the issue of desertification, which many of you are familiar with. He (like many others) makes the case for restoring these deserts.

Then, in the last six minutes, he completely blows everyone’s minds. You just gotta see it. 

tpmmedia

tpmmedia:

Obama: ‘We Will Find Out Who Did This’

“We don’t know who did this or why. And people shouldn’t jump to conclusions before we have all the facts,” Obama said. “But make no mistake, we will get to the bottom of this. And we will find out who did this, we’ll find out why they did this. Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice.” 

theatlanticvideo

theatlanticvideo:

This Is What It Looks Like When Dolphins ‘Stampede’

Once in a while, very — very — rarely, dolphins will abandon their standard serenity and go on a romp that we humans refer to, aptly, as a “stampede.” The phenomenon, which involves sub-pods joining together into one splashy social — and which does indeed resemble the crowd dynamics of wild horses — is an amazing sight: The creatures, choreographed in a synchronized system that would put our own social networks to shame, leap and churn and leap some more in frenzied-yet-graceful unison.

theatlanticvideo

theatlanticvideo:

After 1 Minute on the Floor, Food Has 10x the Bacteria as After 5 Seconds

The science of dropping your food on the ground reveals surprising lessons in this video from the hit YouTube science series Vsauce (1 million subscribers and counting). The show’s founder and host, Michael Stevens, set out to verify the five-second rule, citing research in The Journal of Applied Microbiology and investigations by others, including Mythbusters, to break the bad news (spoiler alert) that it’s no good. ”Five seconds is way too long to wait,” he warns; “bacteria adhere to dropped food almost immediately.” But wait! There’s more. Watch the video below to learn how the structure of molecules makes things sticky and why you’re about one pound heavier after stepping out of the shower.

jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

What Makes Cancer Cells Different?

We’ve talked before about how tricky a disease cancer is. Or, if you want to be accurate, how tricky a “set of diseases” it is. I mean, a single tumor is like a world unto itself, full of different populations of cells, each with their own individual set of mutations. That’s crazy to think about.

Cancer is the result of one of our cells’ most basic and core functions, cell division, gone awry. What causes it, in the large sense? How can we use cancer’s tricks against it to try and treat these diseases?

George Zaidan tackles those questions for TED-Ed in the video above. If nothing else, it’s the best combination of beans, fabric and cancer biology I’ve ever seen in a video. Goes nicely with my TED-Ed video on how the human genome is organized in the first place.

mattchew03

mattchew03:

WORDS CANNOT EXPRESS HOW EXCITED I AM FOR THIS.

ALL THE AWARDS!